Tag: Brandeis University

Oct 01

Simon Fraser 1966-1968

[Translate] Continued from Hell No I Won’t Go) My first impression of Vancouver was of a beautiful vacation land.  I had found temporary lodging in a tiny furnished apartment in the city with a window facing north onto the harbor , and on the first clear morning, the panorama of snowy peaks across the water, almost …

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Sep 30

Hell No I Won’t Go (1965-1969)

[Translate] (Continued from Viet-Report) At Brandeis that fall (1966) a student dive-bombed and crashed a light airplane into the center of campus, killing himself and his female passenger.  Rumors swirled that it was a love pact, a Romeo-and-Juliet affair, but in the background there was the Vietnam draft.  With the massive escalation of the ground …

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Sep 16

Viet-Report (1965-1968)

[Translate] (Continued from Mississippi Winter 1964-65) We left Jackson in April 1965.  My molars were rotting away.  A dentist in Pittsburgh PA who was a steadfast supporter of the civil rights movement offered to work on my teeth for free.  Getting my molars fixed for free, with novocaine, felt like advanced socialism, by contrast to the Cuban …

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Sep 16

Mississippi Winter 1964-65

[Translate] (Continued from Cuba 1963) In the summer of 1964 the civil rights movement launched a major campaign, Freedom Summer, to bring voter registration and other basic civil rights to the Deep South, centering on Mississippi.  Viki and I spent the summer in New York, working. I had a summer job with a branch of …

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Sep 11

Brandeis 1963-1967

[Translate] (Continued from Cuba 1963) After the summer in Cuba with Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, Robert F. Williams and all the rest, Herbert Marcuse at Brandeis was a bit of an anti-climax.  My room in a Cambridge apartment near Harvard Square at that time (fall of 1963) looked like a set from a Godard movie. …

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Sep 06

Wesleyan (4) – Real-World Learning

[Translate] (Continued from College (3) – Paris) During our spring semester in Paris in 1961, the Algerian war of independence  had been in its final stages.  We American students mostly kept our noses in our books.  Still, it was impossible not to become aware of the great agitation in the city and the country.  On many …

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