Tag: Germany

Soccer shocker

While Germany dismantled Brazil on the futebol grass, Israel demolished the houses of Palestinian families in Gaza — and my attention, like much of the world’s, was focused on the soccer game.  In the article below, originally published by Al Jazeera English, Prof. Hamid Dabashi of Columbia University in New York asks why is that.  Excellent question. …

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San Francisco 1968-1973

(Continued from Simon Fraser) At a distance, San Francisco in late ‘68 still glowed from the “Summer of Love” festival the previous year.  But that glow was like the light that continues to travel in space after its source  burns out.  My friend in San Francisco — the noted Marxist economist James O’Connor — then …

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Hell No I Won’t Go (1965-1969)

(Continued from Viet-Report) At Brandeis that fall (1966) a student dive-bombed and crashed a light airplane into the center of campus, killing himself and his female passenger.  Rumors swirled that it was a love pact, a Romeo-and-Juliet affair, but in the background there was the Vietnam draft.  With the massive escalation of the ground war, …

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About My Father (2)

(Continued from About My Father (1)) Those “trials by fire” were not far off.  After a year of study in Basel, in 1938 Albrecht returned to Germany.  He spent approximately a month in Berlin, finishing his theological studies.  In early summer of 1938 Albrecht spent  almost a month traveling in the UK, visiting London and …

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Thumbnail Profile of My Father

This thumbnail profile of my father appears in Protestantische Profile im Ruhrgebiet: 500 Lebensbilder aus 5 Jahrhunderten (Protestant Profiles in the Ruhr Region:  500 profiles from 5 centuries), edited byMichael Basse, Traugott Jähnichen and Harald Schroeter-Wittke, Hartmut Spenner publishers, Kamen (Germany) 2009, pp. 592-593.  The author is Hartmut Ludwig, a church historian and Doctor of …

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About My Father (1)

Growing up as a bomb baby in Germany, as I did, it was common not to have a living father.  About 2.5 million German children lost their fathers in World War II.  Source.  In my case, my father lost his life two months before I was born, so we never knew one another. From my …

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