Tag: Jews

Birthday thoughts

On my 72nd birthday a couple of days ago I ate dinner at the Zatar restaurant in downtown Berkeley and then watched the Welcome to Hebron movie at the Berkeley Community College. Zatar is well known locally and I join the many customers who sing its praises.  The fare is an eclectic mix of Mediterranean …

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San Francisco 1968-1973

(Continued from Simon Fraser) At a distance, San Francisco in late ‘68 still glowed from the “Summer of Love” festival the previous year.  But that glow was like the light that continues to travel in space after its source  burns out.  My friend in San Francisco — the noted Marxist economist James O’Connor — then …

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Wesleyan (1) – The Rush

(Continued from Kansas) After a long train and bus trip, I arrived in Middletown Connecticut in the fall of 1959, lugging a suitcase and a rucksack.  Middletown was only about 30 miles from Rockville, where I had been a foster child just four years earlier.  The campus sits on a slight hill a few blocks …

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About the Authentic Church

Being German and therefore having to begin with beginnings, I started writing my life story by writing the life story of my father.  My father’s life story, though brief — he died at age 27 — was very wrapped up with the German Bekennende Kirche, the Authentic Church, so that in order to understand him, …

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About My Father (1)

Growing up as a bomb baby in Germany, as I did, it was common not to have a living father.  About 2.5 million German children lost their fathers in World War II.  Source.  In my case, my father lost his life two months before I was born, so we never knew one another. From my …

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About the Town Where I Was Born

I was born in Essen.  My father was born in Kiel but raised in Essen.  His mother was born in Essen.  His father worked as an office supervisor for Krupp in Essen.  My mother, who was from Berlin, married my father in Essen.  My mother and I lived in Essen until sometime in mid-1943.  My …

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